Explore San Francisco's PUBLIC ART with some of our favorite ARTISTS.

A project presented by The East Cut Community Benefit District.

555 Mission Street / JONATHAN BOROFSKY's Human Structures *Photo by KATE DASH

222 2nd Street / FRANK STELLA       LISTEN TO THE AUDIO TOUR       PHOTO TOUR

255 3rd Street / BARRY McGEE
Chris Johanson + Kal Spelletich
*Photos by DAVE SCHUBERT


 

KAT GENG x JON LEVY-WARREN

STUDIO SUITCASE PACKED. READY TO GO. JON HAS HIS PAINTS AND GREASE PENS. KAT HANDLES 3D. THIS IS THE OUTDOOR PUBLIC STUDIO.

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303 2nd Plaza / JON KRAWCYZK's Untitled


 

LAURA KIM HYUNJHEE X PUBLIC ART


 

SCOTT VERMEIRE IN THE WILD


 

 

JENNY ODELL x PUBLIC ART BY WOMEN

RUTH ASAWA's AURORA on THE EMBARCADERO                                                                      SEE MORE OF RUTH ASAWA's PUBLIC SCULPTURE HERE

RUTH ASAWA's AURORA on THE EMBARCADERO                                                                      SEE MORE OF RUTH ASAWA's PUBLIC SCULPTURE HERE

Barbara Hepworth was an English artist whose work is exemplary of modernist 20th century sculpture. At the age of 18, she won a scholarship to the Royal College of Art in 1921. She visited the studios of Jean Arp, Picasso, and Brancusi, and co-founded an art movement called Unit One, an attempt to merge Surrealism and British abstraction. Hepworth's sculptures utilized wood and stone up until the 1950s, when her practice expanded to large-scale bronze works. She was fond of viewing these bronze pieces in a garden that she herself had designed. Later on, her home became a museum dedicated to her, and her garden became an official sculpture garden.

Barbara Hepworth was an English artist whose work is exemplary of modernist 20th century sculpture. At the age of 18, she won a scholarship to the Royal College of Art in 1921. She visited the studios of Jean Arp, Picasso, and Brancusi, and co-founded an art movement called Unit One, an attempt to merge Surrealism and British abstraction. Hepworth's sculptures utilized wood and stone up until the 1950s, when her practice expanded to large-scale bronze works. She was fond of viewing these bronze pieces in a garden that she herself had designed. Later on, her home became a museum dedicated to her, and her garden became an official sculpture garden.


 

 

 

All featured public art locations are open and free to visit during regular business hours.